Critical Thinking Logic Puzzles


Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Critical Thinking Puzzles
Make Puzzles

Critical Thinking Logic Puzzles
Puzzle Workbooks for Kids - Updated Each Month!

On this page, you will find dozens of different logic puzzles in over a dozen different categories, including general logic printables in both two and three dimensions, decimals, and measurement. You can choose several different customization options, including whether or not to include algebra in the logic problem and how many different printables to make for each logic puzzle. If logic puzzles are something you want to incorporate into your school day, either in math class or in language arts, you will find everything you need.










     A family
     Color of cars
     Breakfast
     Height of leprechauns
     Easter eggs
     Recycle cans
     The planets
     Thanksgiving family dinner
     Valentine's Day cards



     Breakfast
     Jobs and salaries
     Brothers and sisters
     Vacation to a foreign country
     Doctor's office: match patients with their weight and height
     Students: match grade levels and favorite subjects
     Medical practice: doctors, appointments, and patients
     Women's singles figure skating competition
     Gold, silver, and bronze medals awarded
     Winter Olympics: competitor, country, event
     Bring plants to class
     Halloween
     Christmas



     Students: match grade levels and id numbers
     What is each person's number?
     Number of pennies



     Birthdays



     Number of books (Odd and Even)
     Tickets sold by the school drama team



     Find each person's age
     Basketball: How many points did each person score?



     A vote for president
     Number of pens
     Stickers
     Money in a piggy bank
     Recycle cans



     Employees: hours worked and pay
     Time watching television (with division)
     Fuel economy
     Weight on other planets
     Length, width, height, and volume (same unit)
     Length, width, height, and volume (mix of units)



     Employees: hours worked and pay (decimals)
     Employees: hours worked and pay (pay differs by less than $1)
     Track team: distance traveled
     Track team: time to finish
     Weather: normal and actual precipitation
     Bobsled competition
     Fuel economy
     Weight on other planets
     Mass, volume, and density (with decimals)
     Shipping packages
     Snow accumulation



     Distance a car is driven and its speedometer



     Making ice cream
     High and low temperatures
     Width and length of rooms (feet)
     Width and length of vegetable plots (meters and centimeters)
     Length, width, height, and volume (same unit)
     Length, width, height, and volume (mix of units)
     Mass, volume, and density
     Mass, volume, and density (with decimals)
     Shipping packages
     Snow accumulation



     Student attendance records



     High and low temperatures
     Weather: normal and actual precipitation



     Time it took to finish homework
     Medical practice: doctors, appointments, and patients
     Time watching television
     Time watching television (with division)
     Bobsled competition



     Pizza
     Money spent at the mall
     Time watching television
     Time watching television (with division)



     Car down payments
     Price of gas and fuel economy



     Salaries
     Number of gold medals won
     Time to paint a room
     Time and speed
     Bouquets
     Ages
     Interest and deposits
     Number of coins
     The theater
     Points scored in a basketball game















    














    








Leave your suggestions or comments about edHelper!

Specifically, questions 2,4 and 6 evaluate the knowledge or ideas the reader has on general topics, to a certain degree, rather than testing his reasoning skills. For instance, if I am aware, that human walking speed is somewhere in the range between 5-10 km/h, while most cars can move at a speed between 100 km/h-200 km/h, while I also know that the cruise speed for airplanes used in commercial flights is somewhere around 850km/h, etc. then there is no doubt I would place such options correctly when asked to order them from slowest to fastest. In order to give the right answer to this kind of questions, you only have to possess the piece of knowledge on a given topic and be able to recall the data, while the amount of actual reasoning thereafter is close to zero.( I can also agree with "Andra" user on the issue with question 6, i.e. volume of a creek). So they can hardly be described either as "critical thinking puzzles" or "puzzles" at all. Regarding the rest of the questions (1,3,5 and 7), they mostly call for the knowledge of definitions of respective items, where once again, as long as you know the definitions, you can automatically give at least one correct answer to them. Problems arise if you don't possess the necessary knowledge, but that's a different story. In any case, these 4 questions, similar to the other 3 can hardly evaluate your "critical thinking" skills.

An example of a low level "puzzle" to evaluate your critical thinking skills would be e.g. some variety of multiple choice test. A more complex alternative would be a text where you have to identify the issue(s), the conclusion(s), evaluate the consistency of the argumentation backing up the conclusion(s), reach your own conclusion about the authors conclusions...A somewhat different in nature and at the same time more abstract example would be to solve a mathematical problem or to prove a mathematical theorem.

I think an important idea is that, although we all inherently possess at least a bit of critical thinking capacity, so to speak, in order for this to make any sense at all you must develop critical thinking as a skill, much like you learn a language or mathematics...it's not about playing to see if you got something right or made an error per se, it's about acquiring and incorporating it as a habit for everyday life.

"Critical thinking" isn't primarily about knowing anything in particular. It has more to do with doubt and skepticism about information you have to deal with rather than with possessing or memorizing any particular piece of information. Critical thinking is mainly about the skills necessary to rigorously analyze and filter the incoming information, whatever it happens to be, and since we as humans made our verbal communication the most prestigious language to use, critical thinking is, as a matter of fact, mostly about the capability to evaluate the soundness of arguments of some sort.

So if you want to develop good critical thinking skills, the first option is reading some basic literature on the topic (there are many books of varying degrees of difficulty, although mostly accessible to "laypeople", treating specifically the topic of "critical thinking"). Ideally, you would want to study logic, which is basically the foundation of all critical thinking, paying special attention to fallacies, both formal and informal. If that doesn't happen to satisfy your thirst, then you can continue with the argumentation theory, the scientific method, cognitive science... epistemology, philosophy of science, mathematics (with its undeniably rigorous nature).

But for "beginners" and for those interested in the topic, you can check out the introductory books on critical thinking by Richard Paul (mentioned in this article) Richard Parker, Stuart Keeley, Debrah Jackson, Tracy Bowell and many more. There's a very short and simply written book, called "Being Logical - A Guide to Good Thinking" by D.Q. McInerny, which is probably a good choice if you want something simple and concise, but which I personally wouldn't recommend except for absolute beginners and only as a starting point before taking on some better and more comprehensive textbooks.

Categories: 1

0 Replies to “Critical Thinking Logic Puzzles”

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *